coolchicksfromhistory:

Héloïse d’Argenteuil

Art by Elin Denise (tumblr)

Although she was a powerful abbess, Héloïse d’Argenteuil is best known as half of a tragic love story.  Héloïse was already an exceptionally learned young woman when she met Peter Abélard, a famous teacher.  Peter was attracted to Héloïse from the start and he convinced her uncle and guardian Fulbert to lodge him in exchange for tutoring Héloïse.  A clandestine sexual relationship developed and Héloïse became pregnant.  To appease Fulbert, the couple agreed to marry but demanded the marriage be kept secret so it would not harm Peter’s advancement in the Catholic Church. 

The couple covertly married and Peter’s sister adopted their son Astrolabe.  Héloïse went to stay at a convent which led Fulbert to believe she had been cast off by Peter.  Enraged, Fulbert and his friends broke into Peter’s room as he slept and castrated him.  Traumatized and shamed, Peter fled Paris and joined a monastery in Saint-Denis.  Although Héloïse did not feel called towards the religious life, under pressure from Peter, she took holy orders and became a nun.

For ten years there was no communication between the two as Peter advanced as a scholar and Héloïse rose to the rank of prioress.  In 1129, Héloïse’s group was forced out of their convent at Argenteuil.  Peter offered them the Oratory of the Paraclete, site of his former monastery, to start a new convent.  The two began a correspondence.  Héloïse’s letters were passionate and plaintive.  Peter’s responses encouraged her to direct her fervor towards God.  Eventually their correspondence lost its deep emotion, focusing more on the Héloïse’s role as abbess.

Peter’s career as a scholar ebbed and flowed over the years.  He was controversial enough to be briefly excommunicated before his death in 1142.  Héloïse became abbess and eventually grew her convent to include six daughter houses.  She died in 1164.   There is a monument to the couple at Père-Lachaise, although some believe one or both is buried at the Oratory of the Paraclete.  The fate of their son Astrolabe is almost entirely unknown, but a letter from Peter the Venerable to Héloïse suggests Astrolabe may have also joined the Church.

Notes: The couple is usually referred to as Héloïse and Abélard, but as Cool Chicks from History always uses first names the couple is referred to here as Héloïse and Peter.  For centuries Héloïse was believed to be 17 years old at the time of the affair while Peter was 36.   More recent scholarship suggests Héloïse was closer to age 27 when the affair began.

Advertisements

From the kitchen of Fannie Carlson: Danish pancakes. Aeble or Apple was never used in these as far back as I can remember. Don’t forget your special aebleskiver pan. Must be cast iron and well seasoned. The handwriting looks like my mother’s— Barbara Young. Stains on the recipe means it is good and used often. ;D

geekygothgirl:

These picturs are adorable but they also make me a little sad because I will never be as fabulous as this child. 

geekygothgirl:

larissafae:

sakimichan:

fuckyeahtokyoghoul:

injellyfish:

ahkmenra-h:

hellabitcoins:

sansaspark:

magconbabe-matt:

This shit better work

HAH I REBLOGGED THIS LAST NIGHT AND LOOK WHAT I GOT FROM MY DAD TODAY OUT OF THE BLUE

what if we all got paper lol
GUYS I REBLOGGED THIS LAST NIGHT AND I JUST GOT $150 

I am not even kidding but I am reblogging this twice in a row because I just got $275.

holy shot i hope this works!!

LETS DO THISSSS !

JESUS FUCK PEOPLE ANY MONTH WITH 31 DAYS THAT STARTS ON A FRIDAY IS GOING TO HAVE FIVE FRIDAYS, SATURDAYS, AND SUNDAYS OK

THE NEXT TIME THIS SHIT HAPPENS IS MAY OF NEXT YEAR

LOOK AT YOUR FUCKING CALENDARS

Pro-tip: Don’t trust moneymaking advice from anyone who abuses ellipses the way the designer of that poster does. 

coolchicksfromhistory:

Tibors de Sarenom, 12th century

Art by Michelle Dee (tumblr, deviant art)

Tibors or Tiburge de Sarenom is the earliest know trobairitz or female troubadour.  Troubadours were medieval poet-musicians from Occitania, a region encompassing southern France as well as parts of Italy and Spain.  Troubadours composed secular ballads in Occitan, a Romance language native to the area.  Their poems could be intellectual, humorous, and even vulgar, but most focused on courtly love.

Many troubadours came from highborn families.  Tibors was the daughter of Guilhem d’Omelas and Tibors d’Aurenga, two nobles from southern France.  Her younger brother, Raimbaut d’Orange, was also a troubadour.  Tibors married twice and had three sons, one whom became a troubadour. 

Only a single stanza of Tibors work has survived:

Fair, sweet friend, I can truly tell you

I have never been without desire

since I met you and took you as a true lover,

nor has it happened that I lack the wish,

my fair sweet friend, to see you often,

nor has the season come when I repented,

nor has it happened, if you went off angry,

nor that I knew joy until you had returned,

nor…

(Source: Songs of the Women Troubadours)